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Poppy placement respects our vets

By November 9, 2022No Comments
Robert Lindsay was one of many Lloydminster residents to attend last Saturday’s No Stone Left Alone ceremony at the Lloydminster Cemetery. Lindsay is seen placing a poppy on the headstone of his father, Robert Lindsay Miller, who served Canada. Taylor Weaver Meridian Source

 

Despite frigid temperatures and an abundance of blowing snow, many residents still managed to make it to the Lloydminster Cemetery on Saturday to pay their respects to fallen veterans for the annual No Stone Left Alone (NSLA) ceremony. 

The No Stone Left Alone Memorial Foundation is a group out of Sherwood Park dedicated to honouring the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by educating students and placing poppies on the headstones of veterans every November.

Now in its eighth year in the Border City, No Stone Left Alone has consistently seen a dedicated group attend the annual ceremony, which has grown on the international level.

“Lloydminster has been so welcoming to our organization right from the start, and today’s ceremony is really important because it brings an extra element to Remembrance Day,” said Amy Hrynchuk, the No Stone Left Alone site representative for Lloydminster. 

“The kids are going out there, they’re seeing the names on the gravestones, recognizing the sacrifice that was made, and paying their respects by giving that veteran a poppy.”

Hrynchuk also noted NSLA is now international, hosting ceremonies in Kraków, Poland for roughly four years. An inaugural ceremony was also held in France this year.

“Seeing this kind of growth, not just within our communities, is amazing. Last year there were just over 76,000 poppies laid. We want to ensure that every veteran that served in some capacity, gets remembered for Remembrance Day.”

The No Stone Left Alone Memorial Foundation was started in 2011 and the idea was to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by educating students and placing poppies on the headstones of veterans every November.

Hrynchuk was also proud to point out Lloydminster was the first NSLA ceremony in Saskatchewan.

“Now, I believe there are five more cities hosting ceremonies in Saskatchewan, so we’re growing.”